March 2008


Omakase Sashimi & Kikusakari Kurashizuku

O-mah-kah-say means “to entrust” in Japanese. Let Maeda select the best of all his fish with no limits except balance in flavors, textures, colors… This Omakase Sashimi is the same set that was pictured for the Hartford Courant review of Maeda Sushi Restaurant. On this occasion, with color red in his mind, Maeda selected, yellow tail, fatty tuna, tuna, abalone, horse mackerel arrangement, salmon, and sweet shrimp. Accompanying the sashimi is Kikusakari Kurashizuku. It is an unusual sake from Ibaraki, Japan, roughly filtered with remaining rice and koji particles still active in the bottle. The junmai ginjo is a bit on the sweet side and chewy with some champagne-like fizz.

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The Hartford Courant review of Maeda Sushi Restaurant 

A wonderful review of Maeda Sushi Restaurant is published inside the “Flavor” section of the Hartford Courant.  We like to thank Mr. Greg Morago of the Courant.  Please pick up a copy of the paper, or click here.  Or, just click on the picture of the actual newspaper to read.

Marc Yves

pictured: Hartford Courant photographer Marc Yves and Maeda

We have an exciting announcement. The Hartford Courant will have a full review on Maeda Sushi Restaurant inside Thursday’s “Flavor” section. Mr. Greg Morago, Courant’s food writer, had come to experience Maeda Sushi Restaurant (we were told after the fact) and his review will be published along with Mr. Yves’ photographs on this Thursday, the 20th. Please pick up the paper on Thursday.

Sea Eel, anago

 

As in the freshwater variation, sea eel is a cooked ingredient of sushi.  Called anago in Japanese, its characters mean “hole-child,” as they hide in nooks and holes in the sand during the day, coming out only at night to feed.  The freshwater cousin is better known in the United States, but the sea eel is the eel preferred by sushi houses in Japan.  Sea eel is a cooked ingredient of sushi and the all important sauce, called tsume, is also made by the chef – making it a great showcase of the chef’s taste preference and skills.

 

Maeda’s sea eel is poached so softly, it breaks down immediately once in your mouth.  The texture is very fine, much finer than that of the freshwater eel.  The sweet fat is lighter and gentler.   Tsume, the sauce, is made from the broth which the sea eel was poached.  To the broth, soy sauce, mirin, and some sugar among other things are added, and the simmering for a long period thickens the broth into a tsume.  After making the sushi in his hands, Maeda would brush the tsume on the sea eel just before serving it to you.  The sweet and sour aroma of tsume teases you as you bring the sushi to your mouth.  As the sea eel melts, it wraps around every grain of shari (sushi-rice), all seem to meet in a harmony of flavors, textures, and warmth.  It is also a great source of vitamin A.  Now available year-round, sea eel’s natural best season is spring and early summer.

 

“Anago has to melt in your mouth…but if it’s too soft, it will fall apart on the touch of chopstick or hand.  To make it just right, timing is very important during the poaching.  As in any living things, every sea eel is different, so I pay close attention and treat each of them differently.”  Maeda

Sashimi Salad - 新鮮��の梅ソース和え

There are plenty of possibilities within the tradition of Japanese cuisine to make something new.  Maeda did just that with his plum dressing.  Zesty, sweet, and creamy, the sauce dresses the fresh cuts of assorted fish.  Seaweed, daikon radish, and radish sprouts are refreshing and provide variations in texture.

    

Available for a limited time – $8 

Salmon Roe - Ikura 

Pictured:  salmon roe, salmon roe in marinade, salmon roe sushi

 

 

Maeda’s salmon roe is different.  If you have a bad impression on salmon roe – or “ikura” in Japanese, please try one of his salmon roe sushi, or even chirashi, to see if we can change your mind.  Salmon roe, especially what is normally available in the United States, are not ready to be served as is, at least according to Maeda.  Usually, they are overwhelmingly salty.  Maeda’s salmon roe is marinated.  His marinade made from soy sauce, sake and mirin, among other things, eliminates the excessive saltiness, and brings out the naturally sweet flavor of the roe to the front.  Because of the marinade, salmon roe at Maeda Sushi is very deep orange, perfectly round and slippery smooth.  Once in your mouth, it will burst on your bite with its creamy, sweet juice that suggests the grandeur of the ocean.  Maeda uses ample amount of this special salmon roe on his famous chirashi, the marinade sinking into the bowl and giving its signature flavor.  As a general rule, we cannot send the marinated salmon roe to go, because it is meant to be eaten as soon as the chef serves it…please dine in to try this.  Salmon roe is available year-round, but traditionally, the best season is fall.

Gion Festival by Lynita Shimizu

Many guests have asked us about the woodblock prints displayed on our walls.  They are all done by artist Lynita Shimizu, from Pomfret Center, Connecticut.  Her technique derives from her time learning in Japan under renowned traditional artist in Kyoto, and contemporary artist in Tokyo.  Since the mid-70s, Ms. Shimizu has been introduced in many publications, received many awards and held numerous exhibits.  We love her art.  Using a very difficult, traditional technique, she creates art that is not only beautiful, but also warm and playful.  Please visit her website for more information.  You can also pick up a brochure at the restaurant.

Pictured art by (c) Lynita Shimizu